Blog (to buck the system)

  1. — Ann Arbor District Library: http://www.aadl.org/I could write a lot about this site, but will keep it rather short.

    This is the website for the public library of Ann Arbor. This is a blog (powered by the open source content management system Drupal, consisting of static, but mainly blog-able [and commentable] pages). This entire website is a blog… and if I could possibly include their usage statistics in this post, it would seriously delight and embarrass most other website owners. Also, anyone can sign-up and comment on these pages… and everyone who works there is authorized to post entries (and this is as easy as using e-mail, so all it takes is one 30 minute training session!!).

    And, since it’s never always fully serious, make sure to use their catalog and click on the “card catalog image” link for a nice nostalgic surprise. Or, if you want a link to one of those right here, check out this card in the old digital card catalog: http://www.aadl.org/cat/ccimg/1272993/

    ~~~

  2. — Plymouth State University: http://www.plymouth.edu/library/More and more libraries are adopting ILSs and OPACs that operate on open source software. Here’s something completely novel, to me at least.

    You know about the blogging software the runs Joyner Ten and countless other blogs? It is also open source software and it’s known as WordPress. Well, it turns out that a few libraries in the northeast are now using WordPress to power their online library catalogs. From this site, enter any search terms that you want in the search box and your results will resemble a WordPress / Amazon.com page. That said, you can also search the “traditional catalog”… and each of the blog entires will have a link to their specific record in the old catalog (though this does not work both ways).

    Anyhow, these are just two examples (and both, of course, are works in progress… especially the latter). Feel free to leave comments about other institutions that are also using blogs (or anything else Library 2.0) in innovative, hopefully useful and freely adoptable ways.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s